Works Cited

A blog about the bibliography.

Photo by Steve Davis, at a Washington State juvenile correctional facility.

In 1975, U.S. criminology largely abandoned the idea of rehabilitation. A sweeping review found no evidence that rehabilitation programs were reducing recidivism rates. This scholarship fueled a wave of reforms that shifted the juvenile justice system away from rehabilitation and toward other goals like deterrence and incapacitation.

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Photo by Steve Davis, at a Washington State juvenile correctional facility.

Earlier, we showed how juvenile crime rates skyrocketed throughout the late 80s and early 90s.  In 1995, a political scientist named John Dilulio Jr. forecasted that juvenile crime rates would go even higher. He warned of the “coming of the super-predators,” and it started a media sensation. Nearly every state responded by adopting reforms that meant harsher punishment for juveniles. Between 1987 and 1995, an historic number of juveniles were put into adult jails and prisons. Including Jeff Coats. Today, we review Dilulio’s projections and their effects.

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Photo by Steve Davis, at a Washington State juvenile correctional facility.

Earlier,  we showed how criminologists of the 1970s largely abandoned the idea of rehabilitation. A sweeping review found no evidence that rehabilitation programs were reducing recidivism. This scholarship fueled a wave of reforms that shifted the juvenile justice system away from rehabilitation, and emphasized instead incapacitation, deterrence and retribution.

Continue reading