Works Cited

A blog about the bibliography.

You may be wondering why we’ve yet to come back this season. Well, we had to make a tough call… we’re not going to come back for a little while. Yes, we’re on extended hiatus. Here’s why: basically, we’re running up to the end of our funding. So, we’ve got to spend some time on fundraising.

It’s not great, because Sam Fenn and I want nothing more than to simply make compelling radio stories for you to listen to. Instead, we’re sitting here doing non-radio stuff, for now. However, we’re going to be back with some programming later in the season (look out for us term #2).

In the meantime, there’s a couple of ways you can stay connected. First, follow our parents over at The Terry Project. We’re still hosting monthly Bartalk panels, and we’ll post those events up on that page. Second, sign up for this mailing list. I’ll send you one note when we’re back. Next, check out our re-runs on Martin Strong’s show on the new Roundhouse Radio 98.3. Finally, keep listening to good campus radio from our friends at CJSF and CiTR (shoutout to the UBC Insiders show, which is a new UBC must-listen).

-Gordon Katic

Photo by Steve Davis, at a Washington State juvenile correctional facility.

In 1975, U.S. criminology largely abandoned the idea of rehabilitation. A sweeping review found no evidence that rehabilitation programs were reducing recidivism rates. This scholarship fueled a wave of reforms that shifted the juvenile justice system away from rehabilitation and toward other goals like deterrence and incapacitation.

Continue reading

Photo by Steve Davis, at a Washington State juvenile correctional facility.

Earlier, we showed how juvenile crime rates skyrocketed throughout the late 80s and early 90s.  In 1995, a political scientist named John Dilulio Jr. forecasted that juvenile crime rates would go even higher. He warned of the “coming of the super-predators,” and it started a media sensation. Nearly every state responded by adopting reforms that meant harsher punishment for juveniles. Between 1987 and 1995, an historic number of juveniles were put into adult jails and prisons. Including Jeff Coats. Today, we review Dilulio’s projections and their effects.

Continue reading

Photo by Steve Davis, at a Washington State juvenile correctional facility.

Earlier,  we showed how criminologists of the 1970s largely abandoned the idea of rehabilitation. A sweeping review found no evidence that rehabilitation programs were reducing recidivism. This scholarship fueled a wave of reforms that shifted the juvenile justice system away from rehabilitation, and emphasized instead incapacitation, deterrence and retribution.

Continue reading